Difference between revisions of "Coronary artery bypass graft"

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'''Coronary Artery Bypass Graft''', also known as '''CABG''', is a common cardiac surgery procedure in which vein or artery is used as a conduit and is either grafted from the aorta (or if using left internal mammary artery, used in situ) to a coronary artery beyond a blockage in the vessel, with goal of improving blood flow to the heart, i.e. surgical coronary re-vascularization. The left internal mammary artery (LIMA) is considered first choice of graft due to high patency rate of > 90% at 10 years, though saphenous vein grafts are often used as well. It is most often indicated for individuals with significant multi-vessel Coronary Artery Disease, in particular those with Diabetes Mellitus or left main coronary vessel disease; it can also be used on a more emergent basis for those with Acute Coronary Syndrome and ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction cases that are refractory to PCI or maximal medical management. It can be described by the number of vessels to be bypassed (single, double, triple, quadruple) as well as the technique (traditional on-pump, off-pump or minimally invasive direct).
Provide a brief summary of this surgical procedure and its indications here.
 
  
 
== Preoperative management ==
 
== Preoperative management ==
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[[Category:Cardiac surgery]]
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[[Category:Cardiac revascularization procedures]]

Latest revision as of 10:49, 12 May 2021

Coronary artery bypass graft
Anesthesia type
Airway
Lines and access
Monitors
Primary anesthetic considerations
Preoperative
Intraoperative
Postoperative

Coronary Artery Bypass Graft, also known as CABG, is a common cardiac surgery procedure in which vein or artery is used as a conduit and is either grafted from the aorta (or if using left internal mammary artery, used in situ) to a coronary artery beyond a blockage in the vessel, with goal of improving blood flow to the heart, i.e. surgical coronary re-vascularization. The left internal mammary artery (LIMA) is considered first choice of graft due to high patency rate of > 90% at 10 years, though saphenous vein grafts are often used as well. It is most often indicated for individuals with significant multi-vessel Coronary Artery Disease, in particular those with Diabetes Mellitus or left main coronary vessel disease; it can also be used on a more emergent basis for those with Acute Coronary Syndrome and ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction cases that are refractory to PCI or maximal medical management. It can be described by the number of vessels to be bypassed (single, double, triple, quadruple) as well as the technique (traditional on-pump, off-pump or minimally invasive direct).

Preoperative management

Patient evaluation

System Considerations
Neurologic
Cardiovascular
Respiratory
Gastrointestinal
Hematologic
Renal
Endocrine
Other

Labs and studies

Operating room setup

Patient preparation and premedication

Regional and neuraxial techniques

Intraoperative management

Monitoring and access

Induction and airway management

Positioning

Maintenance and surgical considerations

Emergence

Postoperative management

Disposition

Pain management

Potential complications

Procedure variants

Variant 1 Variant 2
Unique considerations
Position
Surgical time
EBL
Postoperative disposition
Pain management
Potential complications

References